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Terms, Icons, and Labels

Many classes have shortcut names used when creating (instantiating) a class with a configuration object. The shortcut name is referred to as an alias (or xtype if the class extends Ext.Component). The alias/xtype is listed next to the class name of applicable classes for quick reference.

Access Levels

Framework classes or their members may be specified as private or protected. Else, the class / member is public. Public, protected, and private are access descriptors used to convey how and when the class or class member should be used.

Member Types

Member Syntax

Below is an example class member that we can disect to show the syntax of a class member (the lookupComponent method as viewed from the Ext.button.Button class in this case).

lookupComponent ( item ) : Ext.Component
protected

Called when a raw config object is added to this container either during initialization of the items config, or when new items are added), or {@link #insert inserted.

This method converts the passed object into an instanced child component.

This may be overridden in subclasses when special processing needs to be applied to child creation.

Parameters

item :  Object

The config object being added.

Returns
Ext.Component

The component to be added.

Let's look at each part of the member row:

Member Flags

The API documentation uses a number of flags to further commnicate the class member's function and intent. The label may be represented by a text label, an abbreviation, or an icon.

Class Icons

- Indicates a framework class

- A singleton framework class. *See the singleton flag for more information

- A component-type framework class (any class within the Ext JS framework that extends Ext.Component)

- Indicates that the class, member, or guide is new in the currently viewed version

Member Icons

- Indicates a class member of type config

- Indicates a class member of type property

- Indicates a class member of type method

- Indicates a class member of type event

- Indicates a class member of type theme variable

- Indicates a class member of type theme mixin

- Indicates that the class, member, or guide is new in the currently viewed version

Class Member Quick-Nav Menu

Just below the class name on an API doc page is a row of buttons corresponding to the types of members owned by the current class. Each button shows a count of members by type (this count is updated as filters are applied). Clicking the button will navigate you to that member section. Hovering over the member-type button will reveal a popup menu of all members of that type for quick navigation.

Getter and Setter Methods

Getting and setter methods that correlate to a class config option will show up in the methods section as well as in the configs section of both the API doc and the member-type menus just beneath the config they work with. The getter and setter method documentation will be found in the config row for easy reference.

History Bar

Your page history is kept in localstorage and displayed (using the available real estate) just below the top title bar. By default, the only search results shown are the pages matching the product / version you're currently viewing. You can expand what is displayed by clicking on the button on the right-hand side of the history bar and choosing the "All" radio option. This will show all recent pages in the history bar for all products / versions.

Within the history config menu you will also see a listing of your recent page visits. The results are filtered by the "Current Product / Version" and "All" radio options. Clicking on the button will clear the history bar as well as the history kept in local storage.

If "All" is selected in the history config menu the checkbox option for "Show product details in the history bar" will be enabled. When checked, the product/version for each historic page will show alongside the page name in the history bar. Hovering the cursor over the page names in the history bar will also show the product/version as a tooltip.

Search and Filters

Both API docs and guides can be searched for using the search field at the top of the page.

On API doc pages there is also a filter input field that filters the member rows using the filter string. In addition to filtering by string you can filter the class members by access level, inheritance, and read only. This is done using the checkboxes at the top of the page.

The checkbox at the bottom of the API class navigation tree filters the class list to include or exclude private classes.

Clicking on an empty search field will show your last 10 searches for quick navigation.

API Doc Class Metadata

Each API doc page (with the exception of Javascript primitives pages) has a menu view of metadata relating to that class. This metadata view will have one or more of the following:

Expanding and Collapsing Examples and Class Members

Runnable examples (Fiddles) are expanded on a page by default. You can collapse and expand example code blocks individually using the arrow on the top-left of the code block. You can also toggle the collapse state of all examples using the toggle button on the top-right of the page. The toggle-all state will be remembered between page loads.

Class members are collapsed on a page by default. You can expand and collapse members using the arrow icon on the left of the member row or globally using the expand / collapse all toggle button top-right.

Desktop -vs- Mobile View

Viewing the docs on narrower screens or browsers will result in a view optimized for a smaller form factor. The primary differences between the desktop and "mobile" view are:

Viewing the Class Source

The class source can be viewed by clicking on the class name at the top of an API doc page. The source for class members can be viewed by clicking on the "view source" link on the right-hand side of the member row.

Ext JS 6.2.1 - Classic Toolkit


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Hierarchy

Number

Summary

Creates a wrapper object to allow you to work with numerical values.

The primary uses for the Number object are:

If the argument cannot be converted into a number, it returns NaN.

In a non-constructor context (i.e., without the new operator), Number can be used to perform a type conversion.

Using the Number object to assign values to numeric variables

The following example uses the Number object's properties to assign values to several numeric variables:

biggestNum = Number.MAX_VALUE;
smallestNum = Number.MIN_VALUE;
infiniteNum = Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
negInfiniteNum = Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY;
notANum = Number.NaN;

Using Number to convert a Date object

The following example converts the Date object to a numerical value using Number as a function:

var d = new Date("December 17, 1995 03:24:00");
print(Number(d));

This displays "819199440000".

The following example converts the Date object to a numerical value using Number as a function:

Documentation for this class comes from [MDN](https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Number) and is available under [Creative Commons: Attribution-Sharealike license](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/).
No members found using the current filters

properties

Instance Properties

NEGATIVE_INFINITY : Number

Special value representing negative infinity; returned on overflow.

The value of Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY is the same as the negative value of the global object's Infinity property.

This value behaves slightly differently than mathematical infinity:

  • Any positive value, including POSITIVE_INFINITY, multiplied by NEGATIVE_INFINITY is NEGATIVE_INFINITY.
  • Any negative value, including NEGATIVE_INFINITY, multiplied by NEGATIVE_INFINITY is POSITIVE_INFINITY.
  • Zero multiplied by NEGATIVE_INFINITY is NaN.
  • NaN multiplied by NEGATIVE_INFINITY is NaN.
  • NEGATIVE_INFINITY, divided by any negative value except NEGATIVE_INFINITY, is POSITIVE_INFINITY.
  • NEGATIVE_INFINITY, divided by any positive value except POSITIVE_INFINITY, is NEGATIVE_INFINITY.
  • NEGATIVE_INFINITY, divided by either NEGATIVE_INFINITY or POSITIVE_INFINITY, is NaN.
  • Any number divided by NEGATIVE_INFINITY is Zero.

Several JavaScript methods (such as the Number constructor, parseFloat, and parseInt) return NaN if the value specified in the parameter is significantly lower than Number.MIN_VALUE.

You might use the Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY property to indicate an error condition that returns a finite number in case of success. Note, however, that isFinite would be more appropriate in such a case.

In the following example, the variable smallNumber is assigned a value that is smaller than the minimum value. When the if statement executes, smallNumber has the value "-Infinity", so smallNumber is set to a more manageable value before continuing.

var smallNumber = (-Number.MAX_VALUE) * 2
if (smallNumber == Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY) {
    smallNumber = returnFinite();
}

POSITIVE_INFINITY : Number

Special value representing infinity; returned on overflow.

The value of Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY is the same as the value of the global object's Infinity property.

This value behaves slightly differently than mathematical infinity:

  • Any positive value, including POSITIVE_INFINITY, multiplied by POSITIVE_INFINITY is POSITIVE_INFINITY.
  • Any negative value, including NEGATIVE_INFINITY, multiplied by POSITIVE_INFINITY is NEGATIVE_INFINITY.
  • Zero multiplied by POSITIVE_INFINITY is NaN.
  • NaN multiplied by POSITIVE_INFINITY is NaN.
  • POSITIVE_INFINITY, divided by any negative value except NEGATIVE_INFINITY, is NEGATIVE_INFINITY.
  • POSITIVE_INFINITY, divided by any positive value except POSITIVE_INFINITY, is POSITIVE_INFINITY.
  • POSITIVE_INFINITY, divided by either NEGATIVE_INFINITY or POSITIVE_INFINITY, is NaN.
  • Any number divided by POSITIVE_INFINITY is Zero.

Several JavaScript methods (such as the Number constructor, parseFloat, and parseInt) return NaN if the value specified in the parameter is significantly higher than Number.MAX_VALUE.

You might use the Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY property to indicate an error condition that returns a finite number in case of success. Note, however, that isFinite would be more appropriate in such a case.

In the following example, the variable bigNumber is assigned a value that is larger than the maximum value. When the if statement executes, bigNumber has the value "Infinity", so bigNumber is set to a more manageable value before continuing.

var bigNumber = Number.MAX_VALUE * 2
if (bigNumber == Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY) {
    bigNumber = returnFinite();
}
Static Properties

MAX_VALUE : Number
static sta

The largest positive representable number. The largest negative representable number is -MAX_VALUE.

The MAX_VALUE property has a value of approximately 1.79E+308. Values larger than MAX_VALUE are represented as "Infinity".

Because MAX_VALUE is a static property of Number, you always use it as Number.MAX_VALUE, rather than as a property of a Number object you created.

The following code multiplies two numeric values. If the result is less than or equal to MAX_VALUE, the func1 function is called; otherwise, the func2 function is called.

if (num1 * num2 <= Number.MAX_VALUE)
    func1();
else
    func2();

MIN_VALUE : Number
static sta

The smallest positive representable number -- that is, the positive number closest to zero (without actually being zero). The smallest negative representable number is -MIN_VALUE.

The MIN_VALUE property is the number closest to 0, not the most negative number, that JavaScript can represent.

MIN_VALUE has a value of approximately 5e-324. Values smaller than MIN_VALUE ("underflow values") are converted to 0.

Because MIN_VALUE is a static property of Number, you always use it as Number.MIN_VALUE, rather than as a property of a Number object you created.

The following code divides two numeric values. If the result is greater than or equal to MIN_VALUE, the func1 function is called; otherwise, the func2 function is called.

if (num1 / num2 >= Number.MIN_VALUE)
    func1()
else
    func2()

NaN : Number
static sta

Special "not a number" value.

methods

Instance Methods

constructor ( value )

Creates new Number object.

Parameters

value :  Object

The numeric value of the object being created.

toExponential ( fractionDigits ) : String

Returns a string representing the number in exponential notation.

A string representing a Number object in exponential notation with one digit before the decimal point, rounded to fractionDigits digits after the decimal point. If the fractionDigits argument is omitted, the number of digits after the decimal point defaults to the number of digits necessary to represent the value uniquely.

If you use the toExponential method for a numeric literal and the numeric literal has no exponent and no decimal point, leave a space before the dot that precedes the method call to prevent the dot from being interpreted as a decimal point.

If a number has more digits that requested by the fractionDigits parameter, the number is rounded to the nearest number represented by fractionDigits digits. See the discussion of rounding in the description of the toFixed method, which also applies to toExponential.

var num=77.1234;

alert("num.toExponential() is " + num.toExponential()); //displays 7.71234e+1

alert("num.toExponential(4) is " + num.toExponential(4)); //displays 7.7123e+1

alert("num.toExponential(2) is " + num.toExponential(2)); //displays 7.71e+1

alert("77.1234.toExponential() is " + 77.1234.toExponential()); //displays 7.71234e+1

alert("77 .toExponential() is " + 77 .toExponential()); //displays 7.7e+1

Parameters

fractionDigits :  Number

An integer specifying the number of digits after the decimal point. Defaults to as many digits as necessary to specify the number.

Returns

:String
Exponential notation of number.

toFixed ( digits ) : String

Returns a string representing the number in fixed-point notation.

Parameters

digits :  Number

The number of digits to appear after the decimal point; this may be a value between 0 and 20, inclusive, and implementations may optionally support a larger range of values. If this argument is omitted, it is treated as 0.

Returns

:String
A string representation of `number` that does not use exponential notation and has exactly `digits` digits after the decimal place. The number is rounded if necessary, and the fractional part is padded with zeros if necessary so that it has the specified length. If `number` is greater than 1e+21, this method simply calls `Number.toString()` and returns a string in exponential notation.

toLocaleString String

Returns a human readable string representing the number using the locale of the environment. Overrides the Object.prototype.toLocaleString method.

This method available to numbers will convert the number into a string which is suitable for presentation in the given locale.

var number = 3500
console.log(number.toLocaleString()); // Displays "3,500" in English locale

Returns

:String
String representing the number.

toPrecision ( precision ) : String

Returns a string representing the number to a specified precision in fixed- point or exponential notation.

A string representing a Number object in fixed-point or exponential notation rounded to precision significant digits. See the discussion of rounding in the description of the toFixed method, which also applies to toPrecision.

If the precision argument is omitted, behaves as Number.toString. If it is a non-integer value, it is rounded to the nearest integer. After rounding, if that value is not between 1 and 100 (inclusive), a RangeError is thrown.

Parameters

precision :  Number

An integer specifying the number of significant digits.

Returns

:String
String that represents Number object.

toString ( radix ) : String

Returns a string representing the specified object. Overrides the Object.prototype.toString method.

The Number object overrides the toString method of the Object object; it does not inherit Object.toString. For Number objects, the toString method returns a string representation of the object in the specified radix.

The toString method parses its first argument, and attempts to return a string representation in the specified radix (base). For radixes above 10, the letters of the alphabet indicate numerals greater than 9. For example, for hexadecimal numbers (base 16), A through F are used.

If toString is given a radix not between 2 and 36, an exception is thrown.

If the radix is not specified, JavaScript assumes the preferred radix is 10.

var count = 10;
print(count.toString());   // displays "10"
print((17).toString());    // displays "17"

var x = 7;
print(x.toString(2));      // displays "111"

Parameters

radix :  Number

An integer between 2 and 36 specifying the base to use for representing numeric values.

Returns

:String
The number represented as a string.

valueOf Number

Returns the primitive value of the specified object. Overrides the Object.prototype.valueOf method.

The valueOf method of Number returns the primitive value of a Number object as a number data type.

This method is usually called internally by JavaScript and not explicitly in code.

var x = new Number();
print(x.valueOf());     // prints "0"

Returns

:Number
The primitive value of the number.

Ext JS 6.2.1 - Classic Toolkit