Docs Help

Terms, Icons, and Labels

Many classes have shortcut names used when creating (instantiating) a class with a configuration object. The shortcut name is referred to as an alias (or xtype if the class extends Ext.Component). The alias/xtype is listed next to the class name of applicable classes for quick reference.

Access Levels

Framework classes or their members may be specified as private or protected. Else, the class / member is public. Public, protected, and private are access descriptors used to convey how and when the class or class member should be used.

Member Types

Member Syntax

Below is an example class member that we can disect to show the syntax of a class member (the lookupComponent method as viewed from the Ext.button.Button class in this case).

lookupComponent ( item ) : Ext.Component
protected

Called when a raw config object is added to this container either during initialization of the items config, or when new items are added), or {@link #insert inserted.

This method converts the passed object into an instanced child component.

This may be overridden in subclasses when special processing needs to be applied to child creation.

Parameters

item :  Object

The config object being added.

Returns
Ext.Component

The component to be added.

Let's look at each part of the member row:

Member Flags

The API documentation uses a number of flags to further commnicate the class member's function and intent. The label may be represented by a text label, an abbreviation, or an icon.

Class Icons

- Indicates a framework class

- A singleton framework class. *See the singleton flag for more information

- A component-type framework class (any class within the Ext JS framework that extends Ext.Component)

- Indicates that the class, member, or guide is new in the currently viewed version

Member Icons

- Indicates a class member of type config

- Indicates a class member of type property

- Indicates a class member of type method

- Indicates a class member of type event

- Indicates a class member of type theme variable

- Indicates a class member of type theme mixin

- Indicates that the class, member, or guide is new in the currently viewed version

Class Member Quick-Nav Menu

Just below the class name on an API doc page is a row of buttons corresponding to the types of members owned by the current class. Each button shows a count of members by type (this count is updated as filters are applied). Clicking the button will navigate you to that member section. Hovering over the member-type button will reveal a popup menu of all members of that type for quick navigation.

Getter and Setter Methods

Getting and setter methods that correlate to a class config option will show up in the methods section as well as in the configs section of both the API doc and the member-type menus just beneath the config they work with. The getter and setter method documentation will be found in the config row for easy reference.

History Bar

Your page history is kept in localstorage and displayed (using the available real estate) just below the top title bar. By default, the only search results shown are the pages matching the product / version you're currently viewing. You can expand what is displayed by clicking on the button on the right-hand side of the history bar and choosing the "All" radio option. This will show all recent pages in the history bar for all products / versions.

Within the history config menu you will also see a listing of your recent page visits. The results are filtered by the "Current Product / Version" and "All" radio options. Clicking on the button will clear the history bar as well as the history kept in local storage.

If "All" is selected in the history config menu the checkbox option for "Show product details in the history bar" will be enabled. When checked, the product/version for each historic page will show alongside the page name in the history bar. Hovering the cursor over the page names in the history bar will also show the product/version as a tooltip.

Search and Filters

Both API docs and guides can be searched for using the search field at the top of the page.

On API doc pages there is also a filter input field that filters the member rows using the filter string. In addition to filtering by string you can filter the class members by access level and inheritance. This is done using the checkboxes at the top of the page.

The checkbox at the bottom of the API class navigation tree filters the class list to include or exclude private classes.

Clicking on an empty search field will show your last 10 searches for quick navigation.

API Doc Class Metadata

Each API doc page (with the exception of Javascript primitives pages) has a menu view of metadata relating to that class. This metadata view will have one or more of the following:

Expanding and Collapsing Examples and Class Members

Runnable examples (Fiddles) are expanded on a page by default. You can collapse and expand example code blocks individually using the arrow on the top-left of the code block. You can also toggle the collapse state of all examples using the toggle button on the top-right of the page. The toggle-all state will be remembered between page loads.

Class members are collapsed on a page by default. You can expand and collapse members using the arrow icon on the left of the member row or globally using the expand / collapse all toggle button top-right.

Desktop -vs- Mobile View

Viewing the docs on narrower screens or browsers will result in a view optimized for a smaller form factor. The primary differences between the desktop and "mobile" view are:

Viewing the Class Source

The class source can be viewed by clicking on the class name at the top of an API doc page. The source for class members can be viewed by clicking on the "view source" link on the right-hand side of the member row.

Ext JS 6.0.0

Guides
API
top
Guide applies to: classic & modern

What's New In Ext JS 6

Introduction

With Ext JS 6, Sencha introduces a single framework for creating applications that run across all types of devices, from phones to tablets to desktops. You will be able to produce an optimal user experience while writing less code. Combined with a compelling new theme, Ext JS 6 has everything you need to create amazing experiences on any device.

Merging Ext JS and Sencha Touch

The process of merging Ext JS and Sencha Touch has come a long way. In Ext JS 5, Sencha reconciled the core of its frameworks (Ext.data, Ext.app and much more) into the "core" package. The visual layer remained as part of Ext JS proper in the "ext" package. The final step of merging the Sencha Touch visual components required a home for these distinct aspects of the framework. To differentiate the component families from each other in Ext JS 6, we use the term "toolkit".

Toolkits

A "toolkit" is a package that contains only the visual elements of the framework. These include components like panels, buttons, grids and the rest. There are two toolkits in Ext JS 6: classic and modern.

The visual elements of Ext JS are now contained in the classic toolkit of Ext JS 6, while the visual elements of Sencha Touch are now contained in the modern toolkit.

Applications can simply choose their toolkit and add this to their "app.json":

"toolkit": "classic",  // or "modern"

Common Core

Below the toolkits is the common "core" package. The core package provides a common API for things like data (Ext.data) and application architecture (Ext.app). Based on the common core, applications can share code for managing data as well as ViewModels or control logic for communicating with the back-end.

Coming From Sencha Touch

If you are upgrading from Sencha Touch, you'll immediately benefit from access to ViewModels and ViewControllers when using the modern toolkit and the common core. You'll also be using the multi-device event system introduced with Ext JS 5, so mouse events will seamlessly translate to event listeners like touchstart without need to detect device capabilities.

Universal Applications and Smart Phones

With Ext JS 6 and Sencha Cmd 6, however, you can create Universal Applications that can use both toolkits. In this way you can create a single application that targets mobile devices like smart phones or corporate desktops running IE8 or any device or browser in between.

You can indicate which toolkits use which themes by omitting a toolkit key in your Sencha Cmd generated "app.json" and, instead, include a modified builds block.

"builds": {
    "classic": {
        "toolkit": "classic",
        "theme": "theme-triton"
    },

    "modern": {
        "toolkit": "modern",
        "theme": "theme-triton"
    }
}

As you can see, we are designating "theme-triton" for both classic and modern toolkits, but you could adjust the themes in any way you see fit.

If you have the above builds block in your "app.json" a "sencha app build" would build both designated builds into unique folders. You may also singularly build by targeting the build key name. For instance:

sencha app build modern

Our Sencha Cmd generated starter app provides you with a working sandbox to use as a entry point for your application. Or even better, check out the new Admin Dashboard application template we've created (see below).

For more information about build profiles, please checkout the Developing for Multiple Screens and Environments guide

Triton Theme

Central to this release is our latest theme named Triton. Triton is a flat, minimalistic theme that puts the focus on your content and not on decorations like rounded corners or gradients. The Triton theme is the first Ext JS theme to provide comprehensive support for "font icons". Many of the icons used in Triton are from Font Awesome with some useful additions to complete the ensemble. Using Triton, applications can easily control the size and color of these scalable, vector images.

Support for font icons includes such items as panel tools, tree icons, form field triggers, button arrows, checkboxes, radio buttons, grid action icons, grid column and filter menus, slider thumbs, box and border splitters, toolbar overflow indicators … and more. Pretty much all visual elements can use font icons.

Triton theme

Touch Sizing

The Triton theme strikes a balance between desktop sizing and tablet sizing. For classic toolkit, this one size approach is simpler to manage compared to the approach taken by Neptune and Crisp which each provided a "touch-sized" derived theme.

For the modern toolkit, however, due to the use of CSS layouts, we are able to make size more flexibly controlled. On smart phones, the html element automatically gains an x-big class that will scale many items (such as buttons) to give them a larger target area.

Modern Triton theme touch sizing

The KitchenSink buttons on the left are more suitable for desktop, while those on the right would be more comfortable on a phone. You can change the default sizing by simply adding or removing x-big from the html element when your application launches.

Fashion

Fashion is Sencha's new compiler for building themes based on "*.scss" files. Fashion is a Sass-like language with a few useful extensions to support tooling. Fashion is implemented in JavaScript and runs within the browser and, when combined with PhantomJS, Sencha Cmd can use Fashion for theme builds as well as for app watch.

This means no more Ruby system requirement! Because Fashion runs in the browser, we will not need to build the style rules twice (once for the slicer and again with the minimum required content). More importantly, we can do incremental rebuilds of the theme during app watch, which is a real benefit during development.

But there is an even more important benefit to app watch using Fashion - Live Updates! You can open an application in a (modern) browser and the .scss files we be loaded instead of the generated CSS. Fashion can then react to file changes and update the CSS without reloading the page.

Promises Support

Ext JS 6 includes a standards-based implementation of promises that conforms to the Promises/A spec and tests suite. A big "thanks" goes to the DeftJS team for submitting their field tested implementation!

Promises in Ext.Ajax

In future releases we will incorporate promises support in more areas of the framework, but for Ext JS 6 we are starting with Ext.Ajax.request(). This method historically returned an object to track the request in progress. That object is now an instance of a class derived from Ext.data.request.Base which is then-able (in promises terminology). In this way we preserve the current API of Ext.Ajax.request() as well as allow you to write code like this:

Ext.Ajax.request({
    url: 'some/url',
}).then(function (response) {
    // use response
});

Creating Promises

Promises can be created in one of two forms: new Ext.Promise(), following the ECMAScript 6 standard Promise class, and new Ext.Deferred() which has several useful enhancements.

Using Ext.Promise is the same as using the new Promise constructor:

function getAjax (url) {
    // The function passed to Ext.Promise() is called immediately to start
    // the asynchronous action.
    //
    return new Ext.Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
        Ext.Ajax({
            url: url,
            success: function (response) {
                // Use the provided "resolve" method to deliver the result.
                //
                resolve(response);
            },
            failure: function (response) {
                // Use the provided "reject" method to deliver the error
                //
                reject(response);
            }
        });
    });
}

Of course, now that Ext.Ajax.request() supports promises there is no need to do this, but it illustrates how an asynchronous action can be converted to use Ext.Promise.

On browsers that natively support Promise, the Ext.Promise reference will be assigned to Promise and will therefore only include the native features of a promise.

The equivalent using new Ext.Deferred() method looks like this:

function getAjax (url) {
    var deferred = new Ext.Deferred();

    Ext.Ajax({
        url: url,
        success: function (response) {
            // Use the provided "resolve" method to deliver the result.
            //
            deferred.resolve(response);
        },
        failure: function (response) {
            // Use the provided "reject" method to deliver the error
            //
            deferred.reject(response);
        }
    });

    return deferred.promise;
}

The key difference between Ext.Promise and Ext.Deferred is that the creator has direct access to the "behind-the-scenes" object managing the user's promise, that is the Ext.Deferred instance. Using this object, the provider of the asynchronous operation can use additional features (such as progress updates) that go beyond the current promises standard. In addition, the promise instance returned by Ext.Deferred has additional methods that go along with the extra features provided by Ext.Deferred.

Classic Grid

Spreadsheet

The new spreadsheet model introduced in Ext JS 5.1 now has a couple of cool new features. The selection can be made extensible (by setting extensible:true). This adds the "drag-corner" or a small block on the bottom-right corner of the selection. This allows the current selection to be extended either vertically or horizontally.

image alt text

This will be often combined with a plugin that will use the current selection to replicate values into the expanded area (again like a spreadsheet).

Actionable Mode (Accessibility)

Grids also support ARIA's "actionable mode" - an extension of our traditional cell edit mode. This allows all kinds of cell content to be focused and activated using only the keyboard. This is a huge step for accessibility but also makes for happy keyboard users since they can interact with anything in the grid without their hands leaving the keyboard.

Enter actionable mode using the F2 key. ENTER also starts cell editing which is now an example of actionable mode.

Locking grids

Navigation within a locking grid now navigates across the locking boundary. This is in both "navigable mode" (the default cell navigation mode) and "actionable mode" when cell contents are accessible and visited using the TAB key.

Modern Grid

The grid component in the modern toolkit has many new exciting developments as well. In the modern toolkit, much of the grid feature set is actually part of Ext.dataview.List (its base class). The grid is a component list that uses a Ext.grid.Row for each item in its store.

Unlike the Sencha Touch Grid, however, in Ext JS 6, the Row component is now a lightweight container for cell widgets. In fact, cells are instances of classes in the Ext.grid.cell namespace. These widgets come together with ViewModels making it easy to manage cells and their configs using data binding, like so:

{
    xtype: 'grid',

    // Configure the Row (the List item):
    //
    itemConfig: {
        // viewModel: true,  // a default viewmodel
        // or:
        //
        viewModel: {
            type: 'mygrid-row'  // enable formulas etc.
        }
    },

    columns: [{
        text: 'Age',
        // ...
        cell: {
            bind: {
                cls: '{record.cls}'
            }
        }
    }]
}

The Row component ensures that the record property is published to its ViewModel (if it is configured with one). All Cells in the row are implicitly connected to the Row's ViewModel which of course inherits any higher-level ViewModels via the Grid.

The "infinite" list (buffered renderer) will only create a handful of Row components and will recycle them by reconfiguring their record to that of the needed record. This will naturally update the bound configs on child Cells.

Finally, using widgetcell (Ext.grid.cell.Widget) we can put components in a grid cell. And, of course, they can leverage data binding as well.

{
    xtype: 'grid',
    //...

    columns: [{
        text: 'Verify',
        // ...

        cell: {
            xtype: 'widgetcell',

            widget: {
                xtype: 'button',
                ui: 'action',
                bind: 'Verify {record.firstName}',
                handler: 'onVerifyUser'  // route to ViewController
            }
        }
    }]
}

To see the modern grid in action, check out the KitchenSink.

The Treelist Widget

The Admin Dashboard application template showcases not only our new Triton theme but also the newest member of the growing Widget family: treelist. Being a Widget, treelist is available in both the modern and the classic toolkits.

Admin Dashboard app template

Beyond use in a navigation area, the treelist can be used similarly to a tree component. There are a few key differences:

  • Treelist provides a ui mixin (it generated the navigation view above).
  • Treelist has a "micro" mode where only top-level node icons are visible. Children are displayed in a floating element (as seen above).
  • Treelist renders all nodes in its TreeStore (it does not support buffered rendering). Nodes can, of course, be fetched asynchronously.
  • Treelist nodes are themselves rendered as Widgets.
  • Treelist supports selection and hover "indicator" (the vertical blue strip on the selected node).
  • Treelist only supports single-selection.
  • Treelist does not support additional columns.
  • Treelist does not support grid plugins.

This makes a treelist suitable for trees that don't contain too many nodes. For large datasets, the standard tree component should still be preferred.

The KitchenSink example allows you to play with some of the configs on the treelist on-the-fly.

Treelist widget

As you can see here, the ui config can be set dynamically and the tree will update accordingly.

In the modern KitchenSink sink example, the treelist looks almost identical:

Treelist in modern toolkit

Responsive Column Layout

The Admin Dashboard also leverages our newest layout for the classic toolkit: responsivecolumn. A common design goal for applications is to present content in a grid-like form with a variable number of columns based on the available space. With IE8's lack of CSS @media support, this goal can be a challenge to achieve. This is where responsivecolumn comes in.

You create a container using responsivecolumn and describe the layout states you want to handle.

{
    xtype: 'container',
    layout: {
        type: 'responsivecolumn',
        states: {
            small: 800,
            large: 0
        }
    },
    items: [{
        xtype: 'panel',
        responsiveCls: 'large-50 small-100'
    },{
        xtype: 'panel',
        responsiveCls: 'large-50 small-100'
    }]
}

We then add CSS rules to match these classes:

.large-100 {
    @include responsivecolumn-item(100%);
}

.large-50 {
    @include responsivecolumn-item(50%);
}

.x-responsivecolumn-small {
    > .small-100 {
        @include responsivecolumn-item(100%);
    }
}

The result is that each panel takes up 50% of the width when the viewport is "large" (more than 800px) and 100% of the width when the viewport is "small" (less than 800px).

The responsivecolumn layout will add a CSS class to the container based on which state matches the current viewport size. These dynamically maintained classes allow all browsers to apply appropriate styling without requiring @media. The responsivecolumn layout is found in the "ux" package.

Theming In The Modern Toolkit

With the introduction of Triton in the modern toolkit we have given a lot of attention to theme creation. We've organized themes into packages to enable theme derivation. In fact the Triton theme extends the Neptune theme which is also available now in the modern toolkit. We've also revisited the concept of the "ui" config and optimized how it is handled. Since modern browsers don't require complex solutions like framing, ui mixins can be made significantly simpler and therefore more flexible and efficient.

We started with buttons and created the new button-ui mixin. This mixin takes many optional arguments (currently 45!) that you can use to tune almost every visual aspect of the Ext.Button component. The key difference from the classic mixin is that this mixin will only generate the few additional style rules needed to achieve the given adjustments.

To see how this works, consider this use of button-ui:

{
    xtype: 'button',
    ui: 'rounded'
}

//...

@include button-ui(
    $ui: 'rounded',
    $border-radius: 8px,
    $border-radius-big: 12px  // size when x-big is present
);

The entire generated CSS would look something like this:

.x-button-rounded {
    border-radius: 8px;
}
.x-big .x-button-round {
    border-radius: 12px;
}

This implies that the button element will get most of its styling from the x-button CSS class and will gain the above styles as well. You can even use multiple names in the ui config to compose multiple adjustments:

{
    xtype: 'button',
    ui: 'rounded red'
}

//...

@include button-ui(
    $ui: 'red',
    $background-color: red
);

The tiny additional CSS needed to make buttons red would then apply via x-button-red in addition to the border radius from x-button-rounded.

We are delighted with what we've seen from this approach and are confident it will help applications achieve their aesthetic goals while at the same time future proof their code by keeping the details behind the mixin API. Look for more ui mixins for other components following this pattern in future releases.

Charts

Pie 3D

The biggest new features in the charts package are the improvements to the 3D pie series ('pie3d'). It now supports labels, legend, highlighting, tooltips, bevels and has improved shading with configurable level of 3D effect.

image alt text

The various sliders in the new Charts KitchenSink example allow you play with each of those and see how they alter the appearance of the chart.

Plugins

The new itemedit plugin allows users to drag 'bar' series items and markers of the 'scatter' series to edit the underlying data.

image alt text

image alt text

Events

Declarative renderers (named methods implemented by a ViewController) are now supported for axis labels as well as series labels, items and tooltips.

Ext JS Premium

With Ext JS Premium there are two additional code packages: exporter and pivot. These packages provide Excel data export and the Pivot Grid to help users display and analyze their data.

Pivot Grid

The pivot grid component is now provided in the pivot package and lives in the Ext.pivot namespace. The main enhancements to the pivot grid are seen in the Configurator plugin.

Enhanced Configurator

image alt text

The interface to the configurator has been revamped and can now be docked on any side, including on the right (or left) as shown above. You can also configure whether or not the configurator panel is collapsible.

Exporter Plugin

The pivotexporter plugin replaces the old Excel export plugin. This one uses a more generic approach and allows you to export the pivot grid data to any Exporter available in the class system.

The pivot package requires the exporter package so you'll need both in your "packages" folder.

Example:

{
    xtype: 'pivotgrid',
    plugins: [{
        ptype: 'pivotexporter'
    }]
}

// Somewhere on a button you may have something like this
//
grid.saveDocumentAs({
    type: 'excel', // exporter alias
    title: 'Excel export',

    onlyExpandedNodes: false,
    showSummary: true,

    fileName: 'export.xml'
});

// saveDocumentAs will try to save the file in the browser. If your browser is not
// supported then do this
//
var xml = grid.getDocumentData({
     type: 'excel', // exporter alias
     title: 'Excel export',

     onlyExpandedNodes: false,
     showSummary: true
});

// and probably send the xml content to the server

Label filter operators

There are two new Label filter operators available: in and not in.

leftAxis: [{
    header: 'Country',
    dataIndex: 'country',

    filter: {
        type: 'label',
        operator: 'in',
        value: [ 'USA', 'Canada', 'Australia' ]
    }
}]

Exporter

The exporter package contains classes you can use to create Excel documents as well as a grid plugin that you can add to your grid to add Excel export capability.

Exporter plugin

This plugin enables grid data to be exported to Excel. It can either save the file if the browser supports it or generate the content for further processing. Grid columns that should not be exported need to have their ignoreExport config set.

This plugin is part of the exporter package which means that it should be added to the app packages folder and required in app.json.

Example:

{
    xtype: 'grid',
    plugins: [{
        ptype: 'gridexporter'
    }]
}

// Somewhere on a button you may have something like this
//
grid.saveDocumentAs({
    type: 'excel', // exporter alias
    title: 'Excel export',

    fileName: 'export.xml'
});

// saveDocumentAs will try to save the file in the browser. If your browser
// is not supported then do this
//
var xml = grid.getDocumentData({
    type: 'excel', // exporter alias
    title: 'Excel export'
});

// and probably send the xml content to the server

Content

image alt text

Generate Excel XML documents

The exporter package contains classes that allows you to generate Excel XML documents with any data that you need.

Here is a basic example of how to achieve this:

var workbook = Ext.create('Ext.exporter.file.excel.Workbook', {
        title: 'My document',
        author: 'John Doe'
    });

var table = workbook.addWorksheet({
        name: 'Sheet 1'
    }).addTable();

// Add formatting to the first two columns of the spreadsheet
//
table.addColumn({
    width:  120,
    styleId: workbook.addStyle({
        format: 'Long Time'
    }).getId()
});

// ... etc ...

// Add a formula on the 4th row which sums up the previous 2 rows
table.addRow().addCell({
    index: 2,
    formula: '=SUM(R[-2]C:R[-1]C)'
});

// Save the document in the browser
//
Ext.exporter.File.saveAs(workbook.render(), 'document.xml', 'UTF-8'); 

The above document will look something like this:

image alt text

Custom Exporters

The Excel Exporter comes with the exporter package and it is used by both grid and pivot grid plugins to generate Excel documents. You can write your own custom exporter classes by extending from Ext.exporter.Base and direct the plugins to use your custom format.

Ext.define('My.custom.Exporter', {
    extend: 'Ext.exporter.Base',
    alias: 'exporter.custom',
    ...
});

grid.saveDocumentAs({
    type: 'custom',
    title: 'Custom export',

    fileName: 'custom-format.xml'
});

More To Come

In future releases we will add additional packages to Ext JS Premium as well as continue to enhance the Ext JS foundations.

Screen Reader Support (Accessibility)

We have integrated ARIA functionality directly into the component life-cycle. This means you won't need a special "aria" package to get correct ARIA behavior. Applications will now support screen readers (like JAWS) without additional effort.

Microloader

Sencha Cmd 6 now includes localStorage caching of assets. This is similar to Sencha Touch's production microloader but with some important improvements.

  • Caching can be disabled in app.json
  • Only the current version of an app will be kept in local storage
  • Only microloader content will ever be erased by the microloader

Browser Support

Modern Toolkit

Desktop

  • IE11+
  • Firefox and Firefox ESR (Latest 2 Versions)
  • Chrome (Latest 2 Versions)
  • Safari 7+

Mobile

  • IE11+
  • Safari 7+
  • Android 4.0+ Chrome
  • Android 4.4+ Native

Classic Toolkit

Desktop

  • IE8+ (Strict DOCTYPE)
  • Firefox and Firefox ESR (Latest 2 Versions)
  • Chrome (Latest 2 Versions)
  • Safari 7+
  • Opera (Latest 2 Versions)

Tablet

  • Safari 7+ (iPad)
  • Android 4.0+ Chrome
  • Android 4.4+ Native
  • Windows 8 Touch Screen - IE10+

Ext JS 6.0.0

Ext JS
Sencha Test
Cmd
Sencha Themer
GXT
IDE Plugins
Sencha Inspector
Architect
Sencha Fiddle
Touch
Offline Documentation

Sencha Test

2.0.1 2.0.0 1.0.3

Cmd

Cmd

Sencha Themer

1.1.0 1.0.2

GXT

4.x 3.x

IDE Plugins

IDE Plugins

Sencha Inspector

Sencha Inspector

Sencha Fiddle

Sencha Fiddle

Offline Documentation

Offline Documentation