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Terms, Icons, and Labels

Many classes have shortcut names used when creating (instantiating) a class with a configuration object. The shortcut name is referred to as an alias (or xtype if the class extends Ext.Component). The alias/xtype is listed next to the class name of applicable classes for quick reference.

Access Levels

Framework classes or their members may be specified as private or protected. Else, the class / member is public. Public, protected, and private are access descriptors used to convey how and when the class or class member should be used.

Member Types

Member Syntax

Below is an example class member that we can disect to show the syntax of a class member (the lookupComponent method as viewed from the Ext.button.Button class in this case).

lookupComponent ( item ) : Ext.Component
protected

Called when a raw config object is added to this container either during initialization of the items config, or when new items are added), or {@link #insert inserted.

This method converts the passed object into an instanced child component.

This may be overridden in subclasses when special processing needs to be applied to child creation.

Parameters

item :  Object

The config object being added.

Returns
Ext.Component

The component to be added.

Let's look at each part of the member row:

Member Flags

The API documentation uses a number of flags to further commnicate the class member's function and intent. The label may be represented by a text label, an abbreviation, or an icon.

Class Icons

- Indicates a framework class

- A singleton framework class. *See the singleton flag for more information

- A component-type framework class (any class within the Ext JS framework that extends Ext.Component)

- Indicates that the class, member, or guide is new in the currently viewed version

Member Icons

- Indicates a class member of type config

- Indicates a class member of type property

- Indicates a class member of type method

- Indicates a class member of type event

- Indicates a class member of type theme variable

- Indicates a class member of type theme mixin

- Indicates that the class, member, or guide is new in the currently viewed version

Class Member Quick-Nav Menu

Just below the class name on an API doc page is a row of buttons corresponding to the types of members owned by the current class. Each button shows a count of members by type (this count is updated as filters are applied). Clicking the button will navigate you to that member section. Hovering over the member-type button will reveal a popup menu of all members of that type for quick navigation.

Getter and Setter Methods

Getting and setter methods that correlate to a class config option will show up in the methods section as well as in the configs section of both the API doc and the member-type menus just beneath the config they work with. The getter and setter method documentation will be found in the config row for easy reference.

History Bar

Your page history is kept in localstorage and displayed (using the available real estate) just below the top title bar. By default, the only search results shown are the pages matching the product / version you're currently viewing. You can expand what is displayed by clicking on the button on the right-hand side of the history bar and choosing the "All" radio option. This will show all recent pages in the history bar for all products / versions.

Within the history config menu you will also see a listing of your recent page visits. The results are filtered by the "Current Product / Version" and "All" radio options. Clicking on the button will clear the history bar as well as the history kept in local storage.

If "All" is selected in the history config menu the checkbox option for "Show product details in the history bar" will be enabled. When checked, the product/version for each historic page will show alongside the page name in the history bar. Hovering the cursor over the page names in the history bar will also show the product/version as a tooltip.

Search and Filters

Both API docs and guides can be searched for using the search field at the top of the page.

On API doc pages there is also a filter input field that filters the member rows using the filter string. In addition to filtering by string you can filter the class members by access level and inheritance. This is done using the checkboxes at the top of the page.

The checkbox at the bottom of the API class navigation tree filters the class list to include or exclude private classes.

Clicking on an empty search field will show your last 10 searches for quick navigation.

API Doc Class Metadata

Each API doc page (with the exception of Javascript primitives pages) has a menu view of metadata relating to that class. This metadata view will have one or more of the following:

Expanding and Collapsing Examples and Class Members

Runnable examples (Fiddles) are expanded on a page by default. You can collapse and expand example code blocks individually using the arrow on the top-left of the code block. You can also toggle the collapse state of all examples using the toggle button on the top-right of the page. The toggle-all state will be remembered between page loads.

Class members are collapsed on a page by default. You can expand and collapse members using the arrow icon on the left of the member row or globally using the expand / collapse all toggle button top-right.

Desktop -vs- Mobile View

Viewing the docs on narrower screens or browsers will result in a view optimized for a smaller form factor. The primary differences between the desktop and "mobile" view are:

Viewing the Class Source

The class source can be viewed by clicking on the class name at the top of an API doc page. The source for class members can be viewed by clicking on the "view source" link on the right-hand side of the member row.

Ext JS 5.1.3

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Introduction to the Draw Package

The drawing package enables you to draw general purpose graphics and animations. These creations can be used with the charting classes and other interfaces to create graphics that work on all browsers and mobile devices. This guide show introduce you to the basic principles of the Drawing package.

Draw Container

The Draw Container is a surface to which sprites can be rendered. The Draw Container manages and holds a Surface instance. Depending on the browser, this interface has an SVG or Canvas implementation where Sprites can be appended.

Drawing Surface

You can create a simple drawing surface without loading the Charting package at all. This enables you to create arbitrary graphics that work on all browsers/devices and animate well. For example, you could create an interactive map of the United States where each state is a sprite, or an infographic where each element is also a sprite. Sprites give you an effective manner to create imagery with helpful interactivity. Also, because the images are Canvas and SVG based, they will never lose quality when sized or scaled. This ensures that will always look "right" and wil be printed correctly 100% of the time.

In order to use the Draw package directly, you need to create a Draw Container.

Ext.create('Ext.draw.Container', {
    sprites: [{
        type: 'circle',
        fillStyle: 'red',
        r: 100,
        cx: 100,
        cy: 100
    }],
    height:205,
    width:205,
    renderTo:Ext.getBody()
});

In this case, we've added a sprite to our Draw container. The type of the sprite is circle so if you run this code you'll see a red circle appear in your browser.

You can also add sprites by using the surface's add method:

var main = Ext.create('Ext.draw.Container', {
    height:500,
    width: 500,
    renderTo:Ext.getBody()
});

main.getSurface().add({
    type: 'circle',
    fillStyle: 'red',
    r: 100,
    cx: 100,
    cy: 100
});    

main.renderFrame();

Note: Additions and deletions from a surface are not immediately seen. You must forcibly re-render the surface in order to realize your modifications. This is why we use renderFrame() above.

Sprites

A sprite is an object rendered in a drawing Surface. They are added to a surface in the getItems() collection. Ext.draw.sprite.Sprite is an abstract class and is not meant to be used directly. Instead, use the standard Sprite subclasses listed below:

The configuration of a Sprite is an object with the following properties:

  • type - (String) The type of the sprite. Possible options are 'circle', 'path', 'rect', 'text', 'square'.
  • width - (Number) Used in rectangle sprites, the width of the rectangle.
  • height - (Number) Used in rectangle sprites, the height of the rectangle.
  • size - (Number) Used in square sprites, the dimension of the square.
  • radius - (Number) Used in circle sprites, the radius of the circle.
  • x - (Number) The position along the x-axis.
  • y - (Number) The position along the y-axis.
  • path - (Array) Used in path sprites, the path of the sprite written in SVG-like path syntax.
  • opacity - (Number) The opacity of the sprite.
  • fill - (String) The fill color.
  • stroke - (String) The stroke color.
  • stroke-width - (Number) The width of the stroke.
  • font - (String) Used with text type sprites. The full font description. Uses the same syntax as the CSS font parameter.
  • text - (String) Used with text type sprites. The text itself.

Additionally there are three transform objects that can be set with setAttributes. These transform objects are translate, rotate, and scale.

Drawing with SVG Paths

As mentioned above, sprite items accept a path value for creating custom sprites that may exceed the complexity of our pre-defined sprite types. You may use special SVG Path syntax to "describe" the drawing path. Here are the SVG path commands:

  • M = moveto
  • L = lineto
  • H = horizontal lineto
  • V = vertical lineto
  • C = curveto
  • S = smooth curveto
  • Q = quadratic Bézier curve
  • T = smooth quadratic Bézier curveto
  • A = elliptical Arc
  • Z = closepath

Note: Capital letters indicate that the item should be absolutely positioned. Use lower case letters for relative positioning.

Ext.create('Ext.draw.Container', {
    renderTo: Ext.getBody(),
    width: 300,
    height:200,
    sprites: [{
        type: 'path',
        path: 'M150 0 L25 100 L300 100 Z',
        strokeStyle: '#333',
        fill: '#999',
        lineWidth: 2
    }]
});

You can see that the above path creates a triangle.

M150 0 L25 100 L300 100 Z

This reads as:

  • M150 0 - Move 150 pixels from the starting point on the x axis, while staying at 0 on the y axis. This makes our origin (150,0).
  • L25 100 - Draw a line from the starting point (150,0) to (25,100)
  • L300 100 - Draw a line from the last point (25,100) to (300,100)
  • Z - Close the path by drawing a line from the last point (300,100) to the origin (150,0)

Translate

Translate can be used to position your sprite after it's been rendered. This configuration object contains x and y attributes for the translation. For example:

var main = Ext.create('Ext.draw.Container', {
    height:205,
    width:205,
    sprites: [{
        type: 'rect',
        fillStyle: 'red',
        width: 100,
        height:100,
        translate: {
            x:10,
            y:10
        }
    }], 
    renderTo:Ext.getBody()
});

Rotate

Rotate can be used to rotate a sprite. The configuration object contains x and y attributes for the center of the rotation (which are optional), and a degrees attribute that specifies the rotation in degrees. For example:

var main = Ext.create('Ext.draw.Container', {
    height:205,
    width:205,
    sprites: [{
        type: 'rect',
        fillStyle: 'red',
        width: 100,
        height:100,
        rotate: {
            degrees: 45
        }
    }], 
    renderTo:Ext.getBody()
});

Scale

Scale can be used to dynamically resize your sprite. For scale, the configuration object contains x and y attributes for the x-axis and y-axis scaling. For example:

var main = Ext.create('Ext.draw.Container', {
    height:305,
    width:305,
    sprites: [{
        type: 'rect',
        fillStyle: 'red',
        width: 100,
        height:100,
        scale: {
            x: 3,
            y: 3
        }
    }], 
    renderTo:Ext.getBody()
});

Interacting with a Sprite

Now that we've created a draw surface with a sprite in it, let's dive into sprite interactivity. We can get a reference to the sprite after adding that sprite to the surface:

var main = Ext.create('Ext.draw.Container', {
    sprites: [{
        type: 'rect',
        width: 100,
        height: 100,
        fillStyle: 'red'
    }],
    height:205,
    width:205,
    renderTo:Ext.getBody(),
    listeners: {
        afterrender: function(me){
            var surface = me.getSurface(),
                sprite = surface.getItems()[0];

            sprite.setAttributes({
                fillStyle:'black'
            });

            Ext.create('Ext.fx.Anim', {
                target: surface,
                duration: 8000,
                to: {
                    opacity: .5
                }
            });                  
        }
    }
});

In the above example, you can see how to set sprite attributes and animate these attributes using the draw package.

As you can see, this package provides is a versatile abstraction over the graphics we can create. What's most interesting about this class is that we aren't tied to a specific shape or structure. Also, all elements support setting attributes and creating animations. Most important, all of this is compatible in all browsers and devices.

Ext JS 5.1.3

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